Sunday, October 24, 2010

The Beautiful Red Rocks of Sedona

This week we are taking you to a place close to home. Sedona, Arizona is 100 miles (160 km) north of Phoenix/Scottsdale and about 30 miles south of Flagstaff. It is a popular weekend and vacation spot. The rock formation above is Cathedral Rock, and in the late afternoon it seems to catch fire with the glow of the setting desert sun.
This is another view of Cathedral Rock from Red Rock Crossing State Park. Oak Creek is responsible for carving Oak Creek Canyon, which opens up to the red rocks of Sedona. This area has been used for filming Western movies.
This is the entrance to the Mi Amo Spa at the Enchantment Resort, our favorite place to stay in Sedona. From the treatment rooms at this spa, you look up at the red rocks of Boynton Canyon.
This is a view of the town of Sedona from the mesa atop which the small local airport sits. It provides an overview of the area and views in all directions. Many of the rock formations in Sedona have names. If you look closely at the right edge of the ridge in this photo, perhaps you can appreciate why it is called "Coffee Pot Rock."
This is Oak Creek, up river from Sedona in Oak Creek Canyon. Does this look like your mental image of Arizona? I didn't think so. Arizona is much more diverse than people realize. It is not all desert. In fact, the country's largest Ponderosa Pine forest is in the high country above Sedona.
You might be wondering, why are the mountains and rocks in Sedona red? They contain a very high iron content. When they are exposed to the rain, the outside of the rocks oxidize. That is the same process as rust. In Arizona, we call this color "Sedona red." Next time you see the Arizona Diamondbacks baseball team on TV, you will notice that their uniforms are Sedona red.

I will close out this series with a Sedona sun set. How did Sedona get its name? Sedona was the name of the wife of the original settler of this area, and he named the town after her.

15 comments:

brattcat said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
brattcat said...

i'll try again. each of these is a stand-alone gem.

Gringo said...

Amazing shots, reminds me of how Ayers Rock looks in the evening sun...

Memphis MOJO said...

Awesome series. I like the technique you used on the Oak Creek shot to make the water blend.

Steffe said...

Wow.

JM said...

Simply amazing! Would love to visit this place. Fantastic shots!

glenda said...

These are great pictures of Sedona. Time for another week-end at Mi amo for some R.and R.

Masahiko said...

Just beautiful!

Traveling Hawk said...

Nice pictures, wonderful valley! The place is made to be photographed!

Joop Zand said...

Wow...These pictures are so beautiful,the light and colors are excellent.

Greetings, Joop

Tash said...

Wonderful, wonderful!
Is the panorama photo from Jerome?

Y. Ikeda said...

This is my first time to visit and leave a comment on your BEAUTIFUL blog. The photography of the tree caught my eyes, especially. I used live in the U.S. for 4 years (3 years in NYC and 1 year in Ames, Iowa). I could have visited Arizona by squeezing my time!
Thank you for sharing!
Have a wonderful day.

alessandra said...

you're a photographer? I invite you to my blog for tourism in Tuscany hello http://tempoliberoblog.altervista.org/

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